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What is Induced Fit Model?

A model for enzyme–substrate interaction states that only the right substrate may cause the active site to align properly, allowing the enzyme to execute its catalytic activity.

The induced fit model is a model for the interaction of enzymes and substrates. It states that only the appropriate substrate may cause the active site to align properly, allowing the enzyme to execute its catalytic activity. It also implies that the active site evolves until it is fully bonded to the substrate, at which time the final shape and charge are decided.

Who Proposed Induced Fit Model?

Daniel Koshland proposed the induced fit model in 1958. It is more widely recognised than the lock-and-key paradigm for enzyme-substrate complexes. The interaction of the substrate and the enzyme is compared to a key (the substrate) that is extremely specific to the lock in the lock-and-key paradigm (the active site of the enzyme).

Induced Fit Model Mechanism

Unlike the lock-and-key concept, the induced fit model demonstrates that enzymes are fairly flexible structures, with the active site constantly reshaping as a result of interactions with the substrate until the substrate is entirely bound to it (which is also the point at which the final form and shape of the enzyme is determined).

Induced Fit Model Citations

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