Research Tweet

Top 10 Best Bird Watching Websites

If you’re interested in bird watching, one of the first things you’ll want to do is find a few good websites dedicated to the activity. Luckily, there are many great bird watching websites out there, and this article will tell you how to find them easily and how to make use of their resources once you do.

1) eBird

eBird is an online database where birders can log their sightings and learn about birds on any continent. It’s become so popular that it led to a standalone app of its own, which you can download for free from iTunes.

Our number one pick for bird watching sites is TheBirdPedia. This site is an online compendium of knowledge about every aspect of birdwatching, from lists of different species, baby birds including baby owl and their preferred habitats to a field guide for quick reference on your smartphone or tablet. TheBirdPedia.com site also gives you ideas for planning trips and outings. If you love birds and enjoy being outdoors, check out TheBirdPedia today!

3) Audubon

This is a great place to start for all your bird watching needs. On Audubon, you can find an interactive list of North American birds, along with in-depth information on their different habitats and identification tips. The website also has a section dedicated to kids so they can better understand what they are seeing. In addition, Audubon offers a selection of beautiful photographs you can use as wallpapers or desktop backgrounds to show off your appreciation for these feathered creatures.

If you’re a fan of spotting and identifying birds, then BirdsFact is worth checking out. This website publishes bird-watching guides for more than 30 cities and towns across all 50 states. The guides are well organized by time of year—for example, there’s an overview on when to spot birds in each month, as well as what areas to check out in order to find your favorite species.

5) All About Birds

All About Birds is a comprehensive resource on all things bird, including everything from endangered species to how-to guides on feeding and caring for birds. It’s an ideal starting point for those looking to learn more about these remarkable creatures.

6) Hotspotter

Hotspotter allows you to search for locations where specific species have been spotted in Britain. There are some great photographs of different species and it’s easy to find out how many birds of each kind there were, when they were spotted and where they were seen. A great resource if you want to get out there and see some rare birds.

7) Birds Count

Birds Count is a great place to start your bird watching website search because it’s packed with user-submitted data. Create an account and make sure to record your sightings. The more data you submit, including location, time of day, number of birds present and even vocalizations, means that you’ll get better feedback when you’re searching for info on specific species or similar sightings in other areas.

8) World Life List

The World Life List is a list of all species of birds, living and extinct, that have ever been scientifically described. This is a dynamic list because ornithologists regularly publish new scientific names, descriptions and identifications of extant and recently extinct bird species as well as relevant information on subspecies, taxonomy, distribution and behaviour. New updates are made available several times per year. For more information visit About WL-Online.

9) National Geographic’s Checklist Project

What better place to start than with one of our nation’s finest natural resource management tools? The Checklist Project is a massive effort to put data about every species and subspecies into a format that can be used by both people in the field and those looking for information from home. The project’s website isn’t as slick as some, but it’s an incredible tool—and it doesn’t even scratch the surface of what they do.

10) Bird Watching Forums

You’ll find them in every city, town and forest from Alaska to Tasmania. Bird watching forums are a great way to connect with others who share your passion for birds. Not only can you find tips on where to go birdwatching, but also chat about everything from bird species to travel logistics. Even if you have no plans of leaving your hometown, it’s still worth joining a forum.

Share

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on email
Share on telegram
Share on pinterest
Share on vk
Share on odnoklassniki
Share on tumblr
Share on pocket
Similar Post:

5 1 vote
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x